Hi All,

On top of the ironing this week, so we’re back to normal 😛

General Weather Situation

We’re tracking pretty much on last weeks forecast, with Monday and Tuesday this week being the change-over days from the dominant high pressure to the once typical, Atlantic low pressure systems and sunshine and showers that used to typify our Spring weather.

From Tuesday, the wind begins to gather strength and shifts to a South / South-Westerly airflow

The wind strength and the arrival of rain will be the features of the weather for the next 10 days, with strong winds towards the end of the week and over the weekend.
Since the wind direction is South-Westerly, it means that rainfall will be lighter in the south-east of the U.K and heaviest in Ireland, the South-West, Wales, the North of England and Scotland.

Regional Specifics & Outlook

A pretty simple picture here with a diving line drawn roughly from Cork diagonally across Wales and into the North of England, above this line, the weather will be cooler and wetter, below milder and less-wet. The combination of strong winds and blustery showers is set for this week and into next, with the only quieter interlude being next Sunday and Monday, as the wind drops and temperatures cool. This only lasts a couple of days though, as the next low pressure whisks’ in from the west to bring strong westerly winds and more rain. Temperatures will be mild, typically mid-teens during the day and remaining mild overnight.

This means no risk of frost and therefore the handbrake is let off in terms of growth 🙂

In terms of rain, Tuesday starts off with light showers dispersed over Ireland and the U.K, but these will be a bit hit and miss, with the first proper rain arriving on Wednesday early morning in Ireland and Scotland, moving quickly into the South-West of England and Wales on Wednesday afternoon and across the remainder of the U.K later that day, but amounts will lessen as it moves eastwards. The next rain front arrives into Kerry on Thursday morning, but this tends to move more diagonally, so the likelihood of rain is higher in the U.K from Bristol, Oxford northwards during Thursday and into Friday.

Another rain front is following on after this and due to move through Ireland on Friday and much of the U.K on Saturday / Sunday, with a more southerly pattern to the rain on Sunday. Looking into next week, after we move through Sunday and Monday’s temporarily lull in proceedings, more sunshine and showers is the order of the day, with strong winds and a nice drop of rain.

Agronomics

You don’t have to be gifted agronomically to know that the forecasted weather will mean good growing weather, so I’d expect greens growth to really kick off this week, with the loss of those cold nights. The rain will be falling at around 12°C, so one would expect the soil temperature to nip up to that and stay there, without the night dip as we’ve experienced recently. In a nutshell that means good recovery from aeration, disease scars and I would hope that any latent disease is able to be grown out, provided of course fertility is in place. The weather characteristics will suit granular fertilisers, one because of the moisture and two because the wind strength will make it pretty difficult to spray, so use these days before it arrives to get everything down that’s due.

I’m glad to write this forecast because it means good growing conditions for you guys and ones that used to typify our Spring, but have been sadly lacking of late.
Of course this may mean too much growth on higher-height of cut areas, but so if you have a chance / and have the budget :), to get an early Primo Maxx out here, it will certainly benefit you, but not for greens, in my humble opinion, it’s too early.

To leave on a positive note, I saw my first Swallow yesterday, flitting over Eyebrook reservoir and no doubt having a good feast on the early buzzer hatch after his or hers long flight up from Africa. Every year it makes me smile without fail, to think that a little bird can achieve so much, it kind of makes us look pretty ordinary as a species in comparison.

All the best.
Mark Hunt